Tuesday, July 27, 2010

SQL Saturday #40 South Florida. Here I come!

Need a few reasons to come to this event?

It’s FREE

You’ll learn from a master. A Microsoft Certified Master. 

Brent Ozar will do two sessions. His first at 0945 conflicts with my first session.  I hope they gave me a small room for my session.  I predict most attendees will be in his session, not mine. He’s guaranteed to keep you awake. No cover charge at the door. Costumes optional.

I’ll get to see Brent’s second session on Disaster Recovery in Hurricane Alley.                    

College football hasn’t started.  So, you won’t miss UF, UCF, USF, FSU or The U.

It’s FREE.

Another Microsoft MVP, Tim Ford, will be there to talk about indexes, DMVs, and mistakes to avoid. BTW, great post from him recently on how being involved in the SQL community allowed him to land softly at a new job when he wasn’t looking.

More MVPs, Twitterati and local experts galore. 

Did I say the whole thing is FREE!

I’m on the schedule for two sessions first thing in the morning:

Why DBAs Should Learn PowerShell

I will detail my reasoning why a DBA would benefit from learning PowerShell.

A DBA can use PowerShell in conjunction with SQL, WMI, and SMO to automate repetitive tasks and better manage their workload.

Automating SQL Server Login Administration and Compliance Audits with PowerShell

Are your internal auditors asking that the administration of SQL Server logins be handled by a third party other than the DBAs? Is your Compliance and Audit departments asking you to determine if password policies are being enforced, who are sysadmins on your servers, who owns databases? If so, come to this session to learn how to complete these tasks quickly and efficiently using PowerShell and SQL PowerShell Extensions (SQLPSX). This automation is capable of adding or dropping logins and adding or dropping members in database or server roles on any server. Also, I will demonstrate how to automate compliance reporting via PowerShell and SMO to report on the usage of password complexity/expiration policies, database owner, sysadmin role members, and other security related information defined in the SMO object model.

I don’t think there is a better training or networking value than attending a SQL Saturday.

See you on Saturday bright and early.

Thursday, July 1, 2010

In the works…

Speaker abstracts I've submitted...

SQL Saturday #40 in Miramar, FL.

Automating ID Administration with PowerShell and SQLPSX

I will demonstrate how I automated ID provisioning using PowerShell, SQLPSX, and my company's standard job scheduler.

Database Hardening via PowerShell

I will demonstrate how I use PowerShell to handle the issues encountered in a Fortune 50 corporate environment that has over 500 database servers and 3600 databases.

Why DBAs Should Learn PowerShell

I will detail my reasoning why a DBA would benefit from learning PowerShell.

A DBA can use PowerShell in conjunction with SQL, WMI, and SMO to automate repetitive tasks and better manage their workload.

The bonus for attending SQL Saturday #40, meeting Brent Ozar and Tim Ford in person.

SQL PASS Summit 2010

Why DBAs Should Learn PowerShell

Described above

Automating SQL Server Login Administration and Compliance Audits with PowerShell

Are your internal auditors asking that the administration of SQL Server logins be handled by a third party other than the DBAs? Is your Compliance and Audit departments asking you to determine if password policies are being enforced, who are sysadmins on your servers, who owns databases? If so, come to this session to learn how to complete these tasks quickly and efficiently using PowerShell and SQL PowerShell Extensions (SQLPSX). This automation is capable of adding or dropping logins and adding or dropping members in database or server roles on any server. Also, I will demonstrate how to automate compliance reporting via PowerShell and SMO to report on the usage of password complexity/expiration policies, database owner, sysadmin role members, and other security related information defined in the SMO object model.